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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
security agency tracking cell phone locations gathering 5 billion records a day. evidently americans' cell phones overseas aren't being repd. more from edward snowden. joining me justice correspondent pete williams. pete, this is collecting data. then if they want to they can do back and see where your cell phone was used. is that basically -- they are not tracking us overseas in realtime when we use our cell phones? >> the term "tracking" used to describe is something of a misnomer, it's not realtime. it's storing the record of where the cell phone was when the call was made. as you say, this was outside united states. the nsa does this the capability to gather data inside but it has not, chosen not to do it but it does track it outside the u.s. it's part of what is in the database of phone calls. go back and try to reconstruct where someone was or try to develop relationships, see who was in a certain place where maybe something bad happened, who was around a person the time the call was made, that data. they say it's valuable to gather information on suspected terror cells overseas. as
the national security agency basically patrolling all the cell phones in the world basically. a lot of young people point to privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care, is this going to be one of the detriments to people signing up. >> first of all, health care is entirely different. it's more like seniors who sign up for medicare or people who file their taxes. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. you're right. young people rightly are sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and to maintain internet freedom. by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights, they spend so much time texting and instagrami instagraming. something is coming up every single day. and so all of us spend more and more of our lives in cyberspace. now, the challenge is, first of all, we do have people trying to hurt us. and they communicate through these same systems. if we're going to do a good job preventing a terror attack, a weapon of mass destruction getting on to the new york subway system, et cetera
's the number of cell phone records the national security agency is reportedly collecting every day. that's five billion per day with a b. top secret do you means leaked by edward snowden reportedly show that they contract individuals and map their relationships. the agency said they collect data incidentally and not deliberately. next number, $5,000, actually it's $5,000 and a car is the amount rob ford reportedly offered a drug dealer in exchange for a potentially incriminating video that showed the mayor smoke smoking crack. the dealer refused to sell the video and wanted to hold on to the insurance policy. three is the number of times dennis rodman will have traveled to north korea. he announced he planned to go back on december 18th. he is training the north korean basketball team for a match. we say game in america. a game in january. rodman developed a close friendship with the dictator kim jung un. 28 inches is how much snow has been dropped in the last 24 hours in part parts of the midwest. two harbors. minnesota got slammed. that's a town there. schools are closed and roads are impassi
the story today about the national security agency basically patrolling all the cell phones in the world, basically, a lot of young people point to the privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care, is this going to be one of the detriments? >> health care is entirely different. it's more similar to seniors who sign up for medicare or people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. and the nsa issue is a broader issue. and you're right. young people rightly are sensitive to the need to maintain their privacy and their internet freedom. and by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights and expectations, but it's particularly something young people care so much about because they spend so much time texting and instagraming and, you know. >> whatever. >> i mean, something's coming up every single day. and so all of us spend more and more of our lives in sign ea si. now the r
're trying to eliminate. >> when you saw the story about the national security agency, basically patrolling all of the cell phones in the world, basically, a lot of young people point to the privacy requirements. they don't like to be part of anything collecting information. health care, is this going to be one of the detriments to people signing up, they want to keep their privacy? >> health care is entirely different. it's similar to seniors who sign up for medicare or people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government, it's protected, it's governed by a whole series of law. nsa is a broader issue and, you're right, young people are rightly sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and to maintain internet freedom and, by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights and expectations in this country but it's particularly something that young people care about because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming and, you know -- >> whatever. >> something is coming up ever
security agency, basically patrolling all of the cell phones in the world, basically, a lot of young people point to the privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care. is this going to be one of the detriments to people wanting to sign up? they want to keep their privacy? >> first of all, health care is entirely different. it's more similar to seniors who sign up for medicare or people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. the nsa issue is a broader issue. you're right. young people rightly are sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and maintain internet freedom. and, by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights, and expectations in this country, but it's particularly something that young people care about, because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming and -- vining. there's -- something is coming up every single day. so all of us spend mo
're trying to eliminate. >> you saw the story about the national security agency basically patrolling all of the cell phones in the world, basically. a lot of young people point to the privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care. is this going to be one of the detriments for people signing up, they want to keep their privacy. >> first of all, health care is entirely different. it's more similar to seniors who sign up for medicare, people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. the nsa issues a broader issue. young people are rightly sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and maintain internet freedom. and so i am. that's part of not just our first amendment rights and expectations in this country, but it's particularly something that young people care about because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming. >> whatever. >> something's coming up every single day. so al
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)